The “I’m Just a Muslim” Muslim, Pt. 2

Posted: March 31, 2008 in Uncategorized

For reasons clearly laid out in my other writings, Blackamerican Muslims had been sold on the completely fallacious idea that they were in essence “just Muslims”, a culturally vacuous identity which denied any recognition of their unique contributions and perspectives on the direction of Islam in America.


Nevertheless, despite the crippling effect that this self-abasing philosophy had on the growth and development of Blackamerican Islam, no one was prepared to disabuse them of it, not even their own leadership, who in furtherance of their own careers as personalities on the immigrant set – the conventions, fundraisers, conferences, etc. – consciously adopted safe, non-threatening, race-neutral persona’s. Those Blackamerican Imams didn’t have to be told anything. Subtle gestures and hints conveyed the clear message that topics thought to be “too Black” – that is, too empowering of Black Muslims or even Black people – would not be tolerated.

This debilitating orientation and outlook left Blackamerican Muslims extremely vulnerable to what I call the “immigrant Muslim Syndicate, especially, and most importantly, the Arab wing of it represented by groups like CAIR, MAS, MSA, American Muslim Council, etc. By means of carefully crafted propaganda, disseminated incessantly through books, sermons, rallies, programs, etc, an unassailable – however false – belief came to take hold in the Muslim community that in America we’re “all in this thing together”, sharing the same problems and concerns. This propaganda was framed in terms of “Muslim unity”, a principle definitely enunciated in the Quran and one which no devout Muslim would ever dare question. The community was constantly portrayed as “under siege”, giving force and urgency to this call for “unity”, no matter the issue and at all costs!

And while its certainly true that Muslims in America share some problems in common, that can in no way be construed to mean their problems are all the same. The issues and concerns of newly arrived immigrants are of course quite different than those of indigenous citizens with long and complex histories in the country.

At any rate, most native-born American Muslims, and almost certainly all the Blackamericans within that group, were completely unaware of the real aims and objectives of this “closed ranks”, “community under siege” propaganda, which was in actual fact nothing more than a well orchestrated – indeed sinister -effort to insulate organizations with close ties to terrorist groups like Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and Hezbollah!

In all of this Blackamerican Muslims, reduced to being “just Muslims” and cut off from their “kafir” families and communities, were expected to go along with the program, not ask too many questions, and serve as pawns in an international intrigue they had little to no knowledge of. The real tragedy in all of this is that their leadership allowed them to be used in this fashion.

Very few Americans, including the overwhelming majority of law-abiding Muslims, understand the shady workings of the the “immigrant Muslim Syndicate” in the United States, who see this country as the “cash cow” for their overseas “jihads”. Unfortunately, many Muslims have succumbed to the pernicious message of groups like CAIR and MAS by subscribing to the unfounded belief that the US Government has somehow targeted them. This type of irrational belief, shared by an appreciable segment of the Muslim community, only underscores the marked (if limited) success of the CAIR/MAS propaganda in recent years. If this belief was in any way founded on fact, the entire Muslim community would have been summarily rounded up in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.

No, what this government is after is terrorists, and those who give them aid and comfort! Blackamerican Muslims must recognize this, and not get caught up in the nefarious, dark dealings of imported, ultra-secret groups, who, to be frank, are nothing more than the middle-eastern “Muslim Brotherhood” dressed up in American clothes. When people are paraded in front of us – like Sami Al Arian for example – as “innocent victims of America’s war on Islam”, we need to look a little closer.

Our Blackamerican Imams, the ones projected as the “national leaders”, allowed us to be used as human shields in a fight we have no dog in! What does “suicide bombings”, “Jew hatred”, and an appalling lust for blood have to do with the religion of Islam! If the pathway to fame entailed neglect of their own Black community, let the record reflect that is exactly what they did. While they were busy jumping on planes from one “fund raiser” to the next, raising money to build huge suburban masjids and schools, they counseled us to attend the next “rally for Palestine” in front of the White House”. Its a shame!

We are not “just a Muslim”, we are Blackamerican Muslims with a responsibility to our God, our families, our communities, and yes, our nation. Later for all the rest of that stuff.

Comments
  1. […] Abdur-Rahman Muhammad once again delivers unbelievable content. The â […]

  2. Salafi Burnout says:

    It is time to wake up out there people. We’ve been taken for a ride

  3. Sister Seeking says:

    Salaam’Alaikum

    I am afraid for your safety brother…

    I don’t believe in censorship, but I am concerned about your family’s safety here..

    May Allah, Yal-Mumin guard you, and your family–Ameen

    : (

    Back later…

  4. DC Muslimah says:

    ASA Brother. Mashallah for this articulate and well-thought post. In conversations with a close friend, I’ve often used this saying to describe the points you articulate in this post, specifically, “that we step over the dead bodies in our community on our way down to the White House to protest Israeli occupation of Palestine or other issues facing the Middle East”. I agree with you that as Blackamerican Muslims, we need to take a more holistic view of our responsibilities to our community at home and abroad. There is an entire Muslim world out there that does not end in the Middle East. There are conflicts and suffering in Africa, thoughout Asia, including Bangladesh, which has one of the worst poverty rates in the world, not to mention the poverty and human suffering that we see here at home in the U.S. and in our own neighborhoods.

  5. IBN ABDUL HAQQ says:

    ASA Sister Seeking you have given brother good advice lets take it a step further.

    I understand the frustration, some of us have been fighting these attitudes for years. Ummah is a very important concept however, and we will be judged on our deeds and actions.Please don’t throw the baby out even though the water is dirty . The same hidden hand that brother is justly complaining about, will use this disdain for ummah to its advantage.

    The British used this tactic to destroy the Ottoman Caliphate, I just am afraid brother could be used as the”Lawrence of America” The plan of shaitan has always been divide and conquer. Lets listen to some advice from the beloved.

    Narrated Ibn ‘Umar : Allah’s Messenger said, “ A Muslim is a brother of another Muslim. So he should not oppress him nor should he hand him over to (his satan or to his self which is inclined to evil). Whoever fulfils the needs of his brother, Allah will fulfil his needs; whoever removes the troubles of his brother, Allah will remove one of his troubles on the Day of Resurrection; and whoever covers up the fault of a Muslim, Allah will cover up his fault on the Day of Resurrection.” (Al-Bukhari and Muslim)

    Narrated Abu Hurairah: Allah’s Messenger said, “A Muslim is brother to a Muslim. He should neither deceive him nor accuse him of lying, nor leave him without assistance. Everything belonging to a Muslim is inviolable for a Muslim; his honour, his blood and property. Piety is here (and he pointed out to his chest thrice). Despising one’s Muslim brother is enough evil for a person.” (At-Tirmidhi)

    Do not envy one another; do not hate one another; do not turn away from another; and do not undercut one another, but be you. O servants of Allah, brothers. (Muslim)

    So if your brother is an oppressor stop him , but as the books of old advised hate the sin not the sinner.Let BAM SHOW THE WAY BY DEEDS AND NOT JUST TALK.

    Br. if you are sincere in your desire to do this, you must unite not divide. We cant become like the ones we justly may criticize.

    The habits of earlier generations have attacked you–envy and hatred. Hatred is shaving. You will not enter Paradise till you believe. You will not believe till you love one another. Shall I not inform you what thing will establish you on it? Spread peace among you. (Imam Ghazzali’s Ihya Ulum-Id-Din,Volume III, p.167)

  6. Izzy Mo says:

    Salaam alaikum,

    Okay, there’s a few things that I can’t understand. I haven’t been a Muslim that long so it seems like I’ve missed out on a lot of recent American Muslim history. But as far as for casting CAIR and ISNA as front for terrorist groups, I find that a little hard to believe.
    After 9/11, the government was looking for anyone or any group with an inch of a connection to the attacks. If MAS, CAIR, ISNA, etc. had anything to do with funding terrorist groups overseas, they would have been shut down in a New York minute. Maybe I misunderstood you or maybe you meant local extremist groups within various communities. But I don’t think the FBI or CIA, with their high tech skills, would have overlooked anything in our major Muslim organizations.

    I’ve read yours and Tariq’s blog about how Blackamerican Muslims surrended their identities. But this must be something that’s particular to a certain region or group in the US because African American Muslims here in Atlanta are pretty comfortable in their identity. For all the criticisms launched against WD Mohammad followers, the message of self-empowerment and self-pride is still there. Are there tensions? Yes, but there’s more work being done between 2nd/3rd Muslims and converts.

    And by Immigrant Muslim Syndicate, what do you mean? It sorta sounds like the mafia or the Yakuza gangs of Japan. You know, like these groups are linked by large sums of money and family lineage. Having friends who work within these orgs., I can’t already you that they don’t have a lot of money.

    I can’t help but feel like this is placing a lot of blame on the immigrant Muslims. Of course, there are racist Muslims–immigrant and indigenous. But why were some Blackamericans so willing, in your opinion, to give up their communities’ interest in order to live up to some pie in the sky dream? Why did they by into the lie? And who sold the lie? That, I feel, can’t be placed at the feet of immigrants because if we loved ourselves enough, we would haven’t listened. We would have gone about our business of being good Muslims who are active within their communities.

    And I’ve heard sermons from many Black imams but I never heard anything like “Jew hatred” or the praise of suicide bombings. I guess, what I want to know is, why did Blacks, in your opinion, buy into this nonsense? There’s nothing Islamic about it. Until we stop pointing fingers at everyone except the person in the mirror, then the problems that persist in Black America will continue. And Fulan and Habib have little to do with that. After all, that picture of the brother proclaiming Arab superiority is that of a Black man. As for the naysayers and people screaming bloody kafir, just tell that you love them for the sake of Allah but that they REALLY do need to shut up. 🙂

  7. dawudwalid says:

    ASA,

    I must respectfully disagree that all the government is after are “terrorists.” As Blackamericans, I hope that we haven’t forgotten the plots to destroy the UNIA, COINTELPRO that wrecked havoc in our groups, Iran-Contra and the other clandestine activities that rogue elements within the government have used to marganalize, prosecute and even kill minorities for political purposes or maintaining the status quo.

    Also, I don’t buy that the organizations that you’ve listed above are somehow rogue, shadow elements of overseas “terrorist” organizations. I hope that you’re not using the likes of Pipes or Emerson as your daleel. If they truly were, the Feds would have gotten at least ONE conviction on the founders of those groups by now.. Every case that the Feds have tried to bring against the Islamic groups since 9/11 have all failed despite smears in the media and prejudicial jury pools.

    I will submit, however, that there has historically been an agenda that was more overseas focus from all of the above, which sucked up many of us. Save Imam WD Mohammed’s community, most Blackamerican Muslims were taken for an “overseas” ride.

    People, however, lean towards their own interests. I don’t put the majority of the blame on these Desi or Arab centric groups. I expect a Palestinian to have Palestine as a number 1 issue; I expect a Bosnian to have Bosnia as a number 1 issue. That is natural.

    Since WE didn’t have an agenda and were too busy fighting about who was truly on the Sunnah, the natural voice of the indigenous was muffled de facto due to the lack of vision and superficial tropes. This wasn’t the majority fault of MAS, ISNA or ICNA.

    What are the solutions for these problems is the real question?

    We all know that many of the children of immigrants don’t share many of the leanings of their parents and that many of them have been influenced by American culture and hip-hop subculture more than their peeps. Many of those who came here have waken up and realize the errors of their ways. We also know that many of those who came into to Islam under foreign influences are shedding them.

    How do we begin to reconcile our differences and work with the sincere people? I’d like to see some posts on solutions.

  8. @ Izzy Mo

    wa alaikum as-salaam

    Thanks for your response. I addressed many of your concerns in part 5 of my “Why Blackamerican Muslims Don’t Stand for Justice” series in which I spoke about our inferiority complex. This is the reason that we have given up our place in the community.

    Atlanta’s BAM community is – as you mentioned – dominated by Imam WD Mohammed’s community. Also, the City of Atlanta fosters an environment of education. Outside of Atlanta the East Coast and Chicago and Detroit, you will not find many BAMs.

    I agree with you, this is why we must start to take on these issues and begin to change it

  9. kameelah says:

    Salaams,

    InshaAllah you don’t dismiss me are young and well-meaning as you have in the past.

    Like Dawud, I will have to respectfully disagree. I found this problematic if for the only reason being the lack of daleel. Daleel is important to maintain our own credibility and to substantiate an argument. Please link all of us to articles addressing how CAIR, etc are linked to this “Immigrant Muslim Syndicate” and extremist groups (If this in fact what you are arguing). I haven’t read much on this so a source list would be helpful.

    Additionally, could you link us to articles that disrupt the narrative Muslims were in fact NOT targeted following 9/11? This would be helpful as I unpack this post. It is my understanding as is the understanding of dozens of civil liberties, human rights and allied organizations (which are not Muslim-based) that America did in fact engage in racial profiling, targeting and other unconstitutional behaviors following 9/11. It is a well known fact, and not liberal conjecture that the War on Terrorism, and its allied invasion of Iraq, and pending invasion of Iran are not in the interest of American safety or preventing terrorism. It has never been about preventing terrorism and we should be careful not to parent government rhetoric about the unlocatable and vague threat of terrorists, a few of which America had relationships with in the past. We are steeped in trillions of dollars of debt not because we are being protected. We must be careful to be pawns of that rhetoric and movement just as much as we need to be careful of not blindly following movements in Muslim communities that address crisis in other countries. All situations require a critical and vigilant eye and mind that does not readily surrender to emotion, unfounded arguments, and syllogisms. To often emotion overrides thinking and frustration and anger bleed into hasty totalizations. It is dangerous to make such totalizations and sweeping assertions because it does not provide much space for flexibility and can be abused by movements that encourage political ends you may not agree with.

    We see this within the Black community where the convenient narratives and truths of one Black person are used to destablize and marginalize the voices of other Black folks. Usually it is not so much that this person has presented a meaningful argument then that this person has presented a convenient argument that can be used to meet the ends of a given movement of political imperative. When Bill Cosby made his comments about Black folks in America, folks swooped on that not because what he said was especially moving but because he has a Black face and was saying what has been said for a long time but him being Black lent legitimacy to the throwbacks of Moniyhan and made these clearly problematic assertions seem more credible or authentic. Whatever your belief about the Cosby statements, the reality is that he has not be referred to in the past as a sociologists, economists or psychologist–why is he now being paid such reverence as a leading thinker? Who do we conveniently anoint as spokespersons and what does this election of spokesperson say about which voices are valued? When in doubt and at a lost for credibility, get a person from the group you are criticizing to parrot what you are saying. We also see this with folks like Wafa Sultan and Ayan Hirsi who have rejected Islam. While neither of their narratives are particularly intellectually intriguing or well founded, they are used as pawns in the movement to stigmatize Islam. Native informants are always well used in this position and there is clearly an industry for Muslims attacking other Muslims. This industry pays well. Let’s be careful not to feed into this industry.

    I get the phenomenon of “Just a Muslim” however I do not believe that in making this point we need to demonize everyone and most organizations in the process. Nothing gets done if the priority is on talking about how we’ve been wrong. If we are going to call out immigrant Muslims for their dismissiveness or devaluing of our voices and diversity we cannot reproduce the same dynamics and pray that the cycle does not continue.

    We are never going to agree on the one cause that is supposed to dominate Muslim American consciousness and should not want to because any such hierarchy of oppression is both unIslamic and counterproductive. We should be involved in multiple struggles and not feel ashamed to do so. Granted there are certain parts of the Muslim struggle that are considered more important–there is definitely a litmus test for your degree of Muslim-ness based on what orgs or issues you are concerned with. Stuff happening with Zimbabwe today are not going to make the top of the Muslim political agenda.

    And we should be united. And unity does not necessitate universality–what it necessitates is a recognition that we make Salaat we are praying to the same God and that each of our struggles are equally valid. I am not ashamed to say that in addition to my work with youth in color through education, prison reform and arts/media that I am also involved with the movement to address problems in Palestine. Yea, some folks probably think Palestine is more important than educating hood kids but when I go in front on Allah on the Day of Judgement I don’t want to carry the burden of not supporting a struggle because so-and-so didn’t support me because at the end of the day the allegiance to a given struggle is grounded not in an expected return or favor but in a sincere desire to see oppression end. If we all engaged in movements based on other folks supporting us when we are in need then we’d never get anything done. Ideally, when I go to teach or work in South Africa other Muslims will be just as involved. It hurts–it hurts bad, I’ve been burned but I can’t withdraw.

    I saw some beautiful things in South Africa and of course it was a different context. I saw Muslim brothers and sisters–Indian and Pakistani thoroughly involved in the service delivery movement, just as much as the Palestinian solidarity movement. This was beautiful to me and clearly not an American example, but something we should look to for inspiration. Something that would be nice to hear about–not just all the bad. What are the meaningful moments that can be used as an example for others? We cannot ask folks to act and think in a certain way without providing an accessible model.

    Last thought, I think there is something also to be said about delivery and audience. How might you deliver this post to a mostly immigrant audience? I think we all hold tight to our ideas and assertions, but a sign of growth and awareness and figuring out how to get the message across to different audiences without being dismissive or abrasive. This does not mean abandoning your stance; rather it means wordsmithing and reframing your stance so that those who need to hear it most can open their ears and inshaAllah their hearts.

  10. JT says:

    I have to agree with Izzy Mo, Dawood, and Kameelah in that your analysis on Blackamerican Muslims is dead on, but you allow your hatred, ad hominem attacks, and conspiracy theories against MAS and CAIR and to destroy your entire argument. You build a beautiful home then burn it down. You are basically saying that the individuals of MAS and CAIR deserve to go to jail. This is very serious charge

    We all need to concentrate on how we can take this issue forward without meaningless attacks that only take away from the debate.

  11. As Salaamu Alaikum Dawud, Kameelah, Izzy Mo, JT and everyone else upset with me.

    Trust me, I will prove every word. By the way, YOU DON’T SEE CAIR or MAS CALLING ME A LIAR DO YOU? Believe me they would if they could. Just sit tight ya’ll. Remember, I live in Washington, DC, the epicenter of this thing, and have been here a long time.

  12. kameelah says:

    Salaams,

    That’s fine. No one is upset–we or rather I am just reminding you that daleel should be presented in the body of your argument, not promised afterwards. Right, we don’t see CAIR or MAS calling you a lair and I am not sure if that is a function of your argument being well-grounded or them not having access to this text. I would imagine that if they saw this they would more likely than not call you a lair. I respect experience and location, but these alone don’t substantiate an argument. I look forward to the daleel.

    jak,
    kameelah

  13. Salafi Burnout says:

    I am not ashamed to say that in addition to my work with youth in color through education, prison reform and arts/media that I am also involved with the movement to address problems in Palestine. Yea, some folks probably think Palestine is more important than educating hood kids but when I go in front on Allah on the Day of Judgement I don’t want to carry the burden of not supporting a struggle because so-and-so didn’t support me

    Kameelah, the issue in the past 20 years has been that the Palestinian issue is the only issue that we should work on and that working on prison reform and such things you mentioned are “unislamic”. This is the problem that many of us have. Why did we fall for it? A new Muslim is going to follow those who they think have currency in the religion. This is what new BAMs were told, so they did it. I have heard BAMs that were into the whole Palestine thing but not do anything when it came to the community they lived in. In fact they would talk about blacks and sound as racist as a member of the KKK.

    So it is not about “well they don’t support us”, but about the fact that we still must convince MANY BAMs that it is permissible to work in their own communities.

  14. Faisal says:

    so according to you logic against MAS and CAIR, 1+1= 3,400

  15. kameelah says:

    @ salafiburnout–the issue is BOTH 1) a lack of support and 2) and a feeling that it is impermissible to work in our own communities. they are inextricably connected and flow from one another–there is no need to select one causal factor. and in reality the logic of “well they don’t support us” is at play because having to work backwards and convince BAMs that they are allowed to work on domestic and local issues is part of BAMs knowing and feeling that they wont be supported by other Muslims if they do in fact choose to make this commitment. and i have heard “well they dont support us” among many BAMs especially following 9/11 and one arab writer wrote extensively about how arab disengagement in the black community prior to 9/11.

    the article: http://seeingblack.com/2003/x022803/arabs.shtml

    while i had some issues with references to being “temporary black,” the article makes strong points nonetheless.

    and i would be interested in seeing some research on BAMs and their political involvement PRIOR to reverting to islam. were they active in black communities before and stop when they became muslim? were that non-active before and this carried over when they became muslim? are they active in black communities in a less visible way? it would be interesting to hear from more BAMs concerning their rationale for their choices of political involvement because id imagine there is more area we need to explore.e

    lastly, i think it might be useful to also look at what is going on on college campuses and in the new generation of muslims. while there is a complete 360 turn i am seeing a move away from the predominance of palestinian centered agendas. and here would be an interesting area to explore what’s been going on insofar as inter-racial relations, hierarchy and political involvement.

  16. Sister Seeking says:

    Salaam’Alaikum Kameelah!

    It’s so good to “see” you back. Ma’sha’Allah…If you would have quit, you would have deprived us of {your} unique genius. : ) I may disagree with you, but I “love” {your} mind! “Young old heads” or “old souls” are very prevalent in my family; I sure appreciate your voice.

    “Daleel is important to maintain our own credibility and to substantiate an argument. Please link all of us to articles addressing how CAIR, etc are linked to this “Immigrant Muslim Syndicate” and extremist groups (If this in fact what you are arguing). I haven’t read much on this so a source list would be helpful.”

    SS: This is indeed a “very” valid point. But let us remember, it works both ways! Where is the daleel from the many immigrants Muslim dominated organizations when it comes to supporting “their” agendas? Other than inflammatory speeches, and videos presented at ISNA, and ICNA conferences designed to manipulate, and play on people’s emotions, what do they bring to the table? What about International Organizations such as the World Court, United Nations, and their subsidiaries who have claims of human rights violations by some of the groups of mentioned in this article? Are we to dismiss them as non-Muslims against Muslims? What about the “practicing” Muslim working for these organizations? What about hearing from the Israeli community? Why aren’t we exposed to both sides of the coin?—I am not dismissing your request for daleel, I’m surprised the brother didn’t present it in the body of his article, but, it works both ways!

    “We are steeped in trillions of dollars of debt not because we are being protected. We must be careful to be pawns of that rhetoric and movement just as much as we need to be careful of not blindly following movements in Muslim communities that address crisis in other countries. All situations require a critical and vigilant eye and mind that does not readily surrender to emotion, unfounded arguments, and syllogisms. To often emotion overrides thinking and frustration and anger bleed into hasty totalizations. It is dangerous to make such totalizations and sweeping assertions because it does not provide much space for flexibility and can be abused by movements that encourage political ends you may not agree with.”

    SS: Excellent point! Absolutely out standing sista! I agree with you 100% but here is my problem: if we do not engage in this discussion because we fear being abused by movements that we would not agree with, how is that apart of the solution sister? Are we not worth the risk?

    continued..

  17. Sister Seeking says:

    “We see this within the Black community where the convenient narratives and truths of one Black person are used to destabilize and marginalize the voices of other Black folks. Usually it is not so much that this person has presented a meaningful argument then that this person has presented a convenient argument that can be used to meet the ends of a given movement of political imperative. When Bill Cosby made his comments about Black folks in America, folks swooped on that not because what he said was especially moving but because he has a Black face and was saying what has been said for a long time but him being Black lent legitimacy to the throwbacks of Moynihan and made these clearly problematic assertions seem more credible or authentic.”

    SS: Again, excellent example of your previous point. Did you read Bill Cosby’s book “Come On People” he co-authored with Dr. Alvin Poussant? If we can’t deal with our issues both publicly and privately because we are concerned about white people, we will never succeed. I agree with him in that we should forget about them, and focus on what we need to do. The fact of the matter is, you can not control others, but you can control your self. People are going to say, and do what they want any way, using that as a justification to close the dialogue is censorship. My own personal approach to community building is that you gather information first, reflect, and then take action. Like it or not, this dialogue is apart of gathering information. When you skip steps it will come back later to bite you in the but. (No pun intended.)

    “I get the phenomenon of “Just a Muslim” however I do not believe that in making this point we need to demonize everyone and most organizations in the process. Nothing gets done if the priority is on talking about how we’ve been wrong. If we are going to call out immigrant Muslims for their dismissiveness or devaluing of our voices and diversity we cannot reproduce the same dynamics and pray that the cycle does not continue.”

    SS: Amen Sista! Let’s not repeat the same mistakes, I wholeheartedly agree. I respectfully disagree that it’s ineffective to speak about the: abuse, injustice, manipulation, and shunning many BAM’s have experienced. You can not change what you don’t acknowledge. Every one deserves a voice, including the people the mainstream community would rather dismiss as being an isolated case. Some of us have a MAJOR problem with the “can’t talk” back attitude: the inability to question or challenge these groups with out being rebuked. These organizations talk about democracy but the fact that any one who challenges them is regarded is “dividing” or “being an agent” makes them look quite hypocritical.

    “We are never going to agree on the one cause that is supposed to dominate Muslim American consciousness and should not want to because any such hierarchy of oppression is both unIslamic and counterproductive. We should be involved in multiple struggles and not feel ashamed to do so. Granted there are certain parts of the Muslim struggle that are considered more important–there is definitely a litmus test for your degree of Muslim-ness based on what orgs or issues you are concerned with. Stuff happening with Zimbabwe today are not going to make the top of the Muslim political agenda.”

    Sister I mean no disrespect to you personally, but this statement:

    “We are never going to agree on the one cause that is supposed to dominate Muslim American consciousness and should not want to because any such hierarchy of oppression is both unIslamic and counterproductive.”

    This is exactly the darn problem… The groups mentioned in the article have chosen the issue: Palestine! If it’s not Palestine it’s another Arab or South East Asian problem. There is no involvement in “multiple struggles”! – That’s apart of the problem sister! Anything that deals with the BA’s in generally is not given the same respect as other issues. To expect people to not be resentful is crazy making in and of it’s self.

    I’m not out to see the destruction of any Muslim organization. Destroying another Muslim will harm your soul, and eventually catch up to your own people. What I do want to see eliminated is their dominance not only here in the United States, but world wide. I feel like saying “Let my people go”. The truth is that many of us may not seek unity with these organizations beyond the fact that we believe in Allah swt. That doesn’t mean we deserved to be accused of diving the ummah or calling other than to Allah swt. –That’s really not right…

    “I think we all hold tight to our ideas and assertions, but a sign of growth and awareness and figuring out how to get the message across to different audiences without being dismissive or abrasive. This does not mean abandoning your stance; rather it means wordsmithing and reframing your stance so that those who need to hear it most can open their ears, and inshaAllah their hearts.”

    SS: Agreed.

  18. Sister Seeking says:

    “-and I would be interested in seeing some research on BAMs and their political involvement PRIOR to reverting to Islam. were they active in black communities before and stop when they became Muslim? were that non-active before and this carried over when they became Muslim? are they active in black communities in a less visible way? it would be interesting to hear from more BAMs concerning their rationale for their choices of political involvement because id imagine there is more area we need to explore”

    SS: I personally think this a wonderful research project that I hope you have time to do! lol Lord knows I have enough of my plate! I’m reduced to power shakes because I don’t have time to eat! Lol

    Prior to becoming Muslim My family, and I were involved with the following organizations:

    1-NAACP’s Youth & College Division

    2-Southern Christian Leadership Conference

    3-National Black Catholic Congress

    Upon my conversion to Islam I did discontinue my participation with these groups – because being young, and stupid I believed they were not Islamic causes so I abandoned them.

    Many things have changed in the ten years I’ve been Muslim…

  19. Charles says:

    “and i would be interested in seeing some research on BAMs and their political involvement PRIOR to reverting to islam. were they active in black communities before and stop when they became muslim? were that non-active before and this carried over when they became muslim? are they active in black communities in a less visible way? it would be interesting to hear from more BAMs concerning their rationale for their choices of political involvement because id imagine there is more area we need to explore.e”

    Sister Kameelah, I have a lot of info on this particular issue. As one from the NOI and connected to Black movements going back to the split of Moorish Science, I can tell you one critique we(young BAMs) have received at the mouths of many 1st Res. NOI and other groups, is that we disappeared from helping to intergrate Black Americans into America on a higher level. The majority of old people I have interviewed thus far, probably above a hundred now, all said that they were dumbfounded by the lack of committment to their racial and historical struggles in America on the part of the youth. The majority of them said they came to Islam as a way to become politically and spiritually involved. In this regard, they were adherents of Black Religion just like their Christian counterparts, bobbing and weaving throughout history, and sometimes meeting on a common center to advance us.

    Many of them expressed pain that so many of the youthful Muslims, those converting in the 80s and the early 90s, relenquished their political acumen and education. These old people have some scathing words for us.

    I have a lot of information to present but I need a secretary. I’m so unorganized.

  20. Charles says:

    I think one of the ideas I need to put out there in all of this is to say that BAMs have to seek self-actualization and maturation. A part of that maturation can and needs to be done without other communities and their organizations. The other part of the process is anchored in developing a new platform from which the BAMs can engage with other communities. It is clear from the post and the comments that even BAMs are not ‘solid’ on the CAIR and MAS issue. I think it is fair to ask the author to produce some evidence. At the same time we have to prepare ourselves because the evidence he may present may not be the evidence we are willing to accept as true. I think it is prudent for these organizations, in fact, for all organizations, to realize they are accountable to us before they can become accountable for us. There is a glaring difference. All in all, are we really ready to address the immigrant and internationally-funded organizations without a mature platform? If these organizations ‘go away’ what replaces them? The same group of people who contribute 100,000 dollars on any given Saturday for CAIR turns around and gives 10,000 dollars for MANA. Who are the main contributors? Another thorn in our side is that CAIR, MAS, ISNA and just about very organization on the bigscreen, along with BAMs and WAMs, help to create a ‘neo-Orient’ view of the Muslim World. I’ll get back to that later.

  21. kameelah says:

    @SISTERspeaking
    I will return to this shortly, because I am at work now.

    There seems to be a lot of confusion here, esp. with reference to things I explicitly did not say or even infer. Exclamation marks aside, I respect your disagreement and will clarify.

    When I asked for daleel, I was asking for it from this brother because his article was the text being addressed at the moment. I purposely did not ask for daleel and substantiating information from others because the focus was the article at hand. In this situation the burden of proof was on the brother. Of course if someone from these organizations and responded and refuted the argument then I would have asked them for their daleel as well. Clearly, daleel needs to be presented from both sides but I like to focus on one issue at a time and the issue here was the brother’s article which was presented without enough context of daleel with which I could clearly assess the argument. I am a history teacher and argue with my students all the time about this–SHOW ME EVIDENCE because YOU are trying to convince me of something, not the other way around. And if this were ever to become a report or journal article, the editor would not accept the article then call CAIR and ISNA to present evidence to refute the argument–it just doesnt work like that.

    Also, I was not asserting that we do not engage in these discussion; rather, we need to engage in these discussions carefully and critically. These discussions MUST occur, but we need to be conscious of HOW they occur ad not just IF they occur. It seems that you have misunderstood my position as an afront to discussion and dialogue–No. My issue is with the method and manner of that dialogue. We can have as much dialogue as we wish but if we are returning to the same points and basing our conclusion in unproductive totalizations that provide little to no space for flexibility and critique–is it really a dialogue or is it just a mastubatory intellectual exercise?

    Another clarification–I did not say that we don’t need to engage in this discussions publicly. I argued that we need to be conscious of when people are being used as native informants to further a political ends. ie. when black folks are supported, funded etc by organizations to argue that there is not racism and that America has done its job insofar as addressing crucial problems.

    Clarification–I did not say that we should not talk about abuse of BAMs, I clearly stated that “Nothing gets done if the priority is on talking about how we’ve been wrong.” We need to talk but we also need to act. I took issue with the castigation that was a) not grounded in any daleel and b) did not suggest a plan of action/suggestion for future dialogue.

    Clarification–I am not sure what you are disagreeing with in the statement concerning hierarchy of oppressions…I said we need to engage in a intersectional struggle and all else is unIslamic and counterproductive. I already asserted that Palestine and allied causes take priority in Muslim communities. What exactly are you disagreeing with? Please clarify because I dont think this was a point of disagreement.

    Again, there is some confusion with what I was arguing so I will restate them:

    1) Daleel is important–from both sides, however, when an argument is made here, I am going to ask for evidence from the person who made the argument. Evidence cannot be promised afterwards–that belongs in the argument, preferably introduced in the thesis statement and supplement with credible links. This is not about not wanting to hear the truth; rather, this is about making thinking and evidence clear so that I can come to an intelligent conclusion.
    2) Ad Hominem, etc. don’t build a strong arguments. My beef was with the deliver and lack of daleel. This is already addressed in point #1. Protect yourself from being called a conspiracy theorist by using daleel.
    3) Palestine and allied causes take dominance in Muslim organizations
    4) Dialogue is important but not just any dialogue. We should be less concerned with IF the discussion occurs and more concerned with HOW (who is speaking, manner, to what ends etc) Too many folks are focusing on having the dialogue and I dont believe enough thinking is going into how these discussions are occurring and who the audience of such discussions are. Public discussions are tricky and awareness of audience and potential manipulation cannot be overstated.
    5) We can discuss the problems, but we also need to work on action
    6) Folks have the right to be resentful–never said this anger was not justified…just channel it productively and I am fine.

    and ditto @ charles–how do we go about this discussion MATURELY and intellectually?

    and charles i am def. looking forward to seeing what you come up with. this is what i am talking about, just give me the raw materials of history to digest instead of telling me something and expecting me to believe it.

  22. Sister Seeking says:

    Salaam’Alaikum Kameelah

    GOTHCA! Sr. Kameelah!

    My apologies to you sister, I did misunderstand you.

    Some times I wish we had a virtual class room where we could talk to each other in person, and ask questions right away.

    On your point number five I’d like to hear your ideas.
    I may not be able to respond today be back later…

  23. dawudwalid says:

    ASA,

    As a Blackamerican Muslim, who just happens to be an Executive Director of one of the most active chapters of CAIR, CAIR-MI, I truly find these assertions relating to terrorism as completely unfounded and slanderous. SEE: http://www.cair.com/Chapters.aspx#CAIRMI

    Basically everything that was stated, which is fallacious is refuted here:
    http://www.cair.com/AboutUs/urbanlegends.aspx

    Things have been stated that the Department of Justice, with its unlimited resources, has failed to prove! Again, very sad that I’m reading the talking points of Pipes, Emerson, Spencer, Limbaugh, and Prager on a Muslim blog.

    As far as funding, the general budget and operations doesn’t come from foreign monies, but from everyday American Muslims. And to compare monies raised by CAIR, a group that has been around for 14 years and predominately funded by upper middle class immigrant Muslims with MANA, a brand new group with a less affluent constituency is a false analogy and a Red Herring argument as it relates to the allegations made above. Anyone who has taken a 200 level class in logic class in college that these are invalid assertions.

    Al-Qur’an (5:8) O you who believe! Stand out firmly for Allah, as witnesses for justice, and let not the hatred of others to you make you swerve to wrong and depart from justice. Be just: that is what is closest to taqwa: and have taqwar Allah. For Allah is well-acquainted with all that you do.

    The Prophet (SAAS) said in a hasan hadeeth in Kitab Al-Mabsoot, “A moment of justice is better than a year of [spiritless] worship.”

    I worry that some of us, in our resentment towards immigrants, are perceived lack of indigenous community success, and/or some personal hurt that we experienced, have gone down the path of dillusion.

    Wallahi, I’m not mad at anyone; I’m sad.

  24. kameelah says:

    salaams,

    no worries. this is one of the downfalls of written language–there is so much possibility for talking past one another

    i will return on point #5 because i am at work and should be technically grading papers🙂. it is something i have been working with my students with–transforming anger into action. anger i think is the most powerful emotion if channeled in a certain way-otherwise it can eat away at you and become more of a poison.

  25. izzymo says:

    Brother Abdur Rahman,
    I’m not upset with you. But accusing someone of terrorism without presenting evidence is irresponsible. The people of CAIR, ISNA and MAS will probably not respond. There’s always somebody accusing them of having ties to terrorism. And because Siraj Wahhaj is linked to MANA and as MANA becomes a stronger organization, they will be accused of terrorism, too. Shoot, some people still think Wahhaj was a collaborator in the ’93 bombing of the WTC.

    ANY and EVERY Muslim organization has been accused of terrorism and the ones that were, were subsequently shut down and had their assets frozen. Our American intelligence authorities are smart and they won’t let a bunch of Muslim orgs. exist if they thought there was a penny given to Hamas.

    You’re writing about some very important issues. But once you start attacking immigrants and black leaders who don’t live up to your expectations, you destroy everything else in the process. Black American Muslims can be just as empowered without all of that.

  26. Abdur Rahman, It’s time to post the evidence…

  27. Charles says:

    Are Muslims as a whole in America honestly ready to accept the claims of the government that one of their own organizations is guilty of sedition? Even if ISNA had been found to be a contributor to terrorism directly or indirectly does not mean the organization would lose outright support. That finding would be hard to swallow, but again, what do we have to replace such organizations? What Muslim wants to see another fall on his face publicly?

    To answer Sister Kameelah’s question; I do not believe that BAMs are at a point where they can tell the standing organizations to get lost, but I don’t think BAMs are ready to have an independent dialogue, to take a constructivist approach. There are simply too many male egos involved.

    I think what we should ask the author and ourselves is, “Why are we having this discussion”? It sounds elementary yes, but I think that is how we set out on a mature, intellectual plain. It is easy to critique these organizations and to defend them, but what we really should hear is that we have a vacuum in leadership. I for one believe the direction we have taken in leadership is wrong. I believe we need more youth, capable new generations who possess acumen lost on their parents. They have a knack for knowing what’s going on at the ground-level; the owners of the house can’t hear the termites.

    We also have to pull on the academic and intellectual resources within our BAM community and the Muslim community at large. We still aren’t seeing the intellectuals out in public with the exception of a few and they need oxygen tanks because they can’t leave their top priorities behind, namely teaching non-Muslims in colleges and universities about Islam.

  28. Safiyyah says:

    Salaams:

    I do agree with a lot of people here that one’s delivery can totally ruin their otherwise valid message.

    However, in a lot of masjids, the donations and zakat money goes overseas. Even a lot of individuals send their money overseas. People have the right to give their charity as they please, however, MANY Muslims and masjids in the US need help. I have received numerous email requests for help from various masjids in danger of losing their building. Most of them are in urban, predominately African-American communities. Imam Siraj has been trying for years to get money to build a masjid in Brooklyn. We all know that some Muslims can write a check and accomplish it. Why does he have to continue to appeal for help in Brooklyn? Manhattan and Long Island have beautiful masjids, Masha Allah.

  29. Aboo Abdillah H says:

    Look at the video in the link below (turn down the sound because of the music). This is proof of how savage blacks in america are.

    Why you want to be associated with them? Follow the way of the salaf instead

  30. Sister Seeking says:

    “I think what we should ask the author and ourselves is, “Why are we having this discussion”? It sounds elementary yes, but I think that is how we set out on a mature, intellectual plain. It is easy to critique these organizations and to defend them,”-Charles

    I just half to respond to this (yes I know I have a big mouth).

    These are my reasons for joining this discussion:

    1)My husband (born Muslim) and I have elected Islam for ourselves, and our goal as a couple, is to raise our daughter, and subsequent children as Muslims. I can not in good conscience ask my daughter to be Muslim, and she has no Muslim peer group. I grew up a practicing Christian, and practiced with out shame because I had other little boys, and girls who I could relate to. My parents were not enough. What helped me get through my turbulent teen years was my youth group. There are Islamic Sunday Schools, and there are so called youth groups at some masjids. My problem is that I am uncomfortable with what they are teaching the children, and I uncomfortable with the attitude of some teach towards black children. Public school systems have embraced teaching children within the context of their culture. Many have tapped into the genius of Dr. Kunjufu and Dr. Janice E. Hale. I’m not willing to regress in that area. Also, many parents have a “drop and go” approach so you can not bond with them, and I noticed that they too are uncomfortable with some of us.

    2) I love Allah, Yal-Wadood… I have a desire to worship, and fellowshipping is an extension of worship to me. My experience with the immigrant community is that they only fellowship with each other, and blacks who are willing to serve them. I want a voice, and I want a place in the community. I believe I can offer something, but in return is compassion and dignity too much to ask for? I am uncomfortable with the immigrant community because I feel I’ve been abused by them( I converted as a kid long story); I am uncomfortable with the immigrant community’s political agendas’; and I am especially uncomfortable in how many of them relate to our children. I am here because I am looking for a decent community not a perfect one a decent one.

    5) We can discuss the problems, but we also need to work on action-Kameelah

    Let me tell you what I’m working on. A sister and I are working on designing a youth group for BAM’s in the Virginia area. In’sha’Allah, when I move into my new home, we will be able to dedicate more time to our project. I’m going to see if some of my family members can hook me up with some coordinators from their local NAACP Youth, and College program to offer consultation. I’d like to see this youth group develop their own “junior” magazine. I’m also “scouting” for young BAM’s pre-teens, and teens who can call a forum to plug into the needs of their generation. Several BAM’s families that we know have complained about the lack of commitment to youth groups in the Masjids. When adults fail to show up or are constantly tardy, it disappoints the children who counted on them being there. That’s what I’m working on. I’m taking my time, because I don’t want to fall into the same pitfalls as the masjids.

    “What Muslim wants to see another fall on his face publicly?”-Charles

    Let me state for the record, I will gain nothing by seeing another Muslim humiliated, and destroyed. I personally have no problem with those organizations remaining in operation- my goal is what you have already stated: “BAMs have to seek self-actualization and maturation. A part of that maturation can and needs to be done without other communities and their organizations. The other part of the process is anchored in developing a new platform from which the BAMs can engage with other communities.”

    “-it is something I have been working with my student’s with–transforming anger into action. Anger I think is the most powerful emotion if channeled in a certain way-otherwise it can eat away at you and become more of a poison.” –Kameelah

    I agree: “Don’t get angry; get smart”! Something else that comes to my mind is a biblical quote “vengeance is mine sayeth the Lord.”

  31. LG says:

    Of course no Muslim is just a Muslim. Nobody can escape his cultural, lingual, or racial background and why should we? But the first and most important part of a Muslim’s identity is his religion. That’s how a Muslim Arab is closer to you than an African American atheist. If that’s not the case, then there is something deeply wrong about your understanding of identity and Islam. Within the Muslim community, then you have every right to be more concerned about the black Muslims because they are the closest people to you than any other Muslim. It is also understandable if Arab Muslims in America want to have emphasis on issues such as Palestine-Israel conflict and American’s foreign policy in the Arab world because of their ties to these issues.

    On a separate note, accusing Sami Al Arian of aiding terrorists is a false accusation. You are rushing to judgment which reduces your credibility. You have to ask yourself what you will gain by siding with the Bush administration on this matter. Sami Al Arian is an innocent man whose only guilt is to stand up to the Israel Lobby and the injustice in the US. In this regard you are no different from your ideological opponents when accusing innocent black activists of every crime imaginable to make their pity points.

  32. Kwame Madden says:

    I know you all don’t agree but as a BAM I am proud of all you for your brillancy and articulation of the subject matter at hand.

  33. Kwame Madden says:

    Lg, can you tell why Sami Al Arian and others supported Bush in the 2000-election?What was Sami and many immigrant organzations trying to gain in supporting Geroge W.Bush and his criminal gang.This is fact not fiction.

  34. Kameelah, you’re as sharp as ever on this one. Jamerican Muslimah, I’m with you. Other than that, I’m at a loss for words.

  35. […] of injustice that Muslims have faced in recent history. Unfortunately, some of our brothers (like this) have fallen to the right-wing Islamophobic propaganda against our […]

  36. AbuYusuf says:

    Never quite understood why Black Imams spent so much time talking about the western Muslim and Muslim unity. At some of these conferences I attended the majority of the audience was south Asian. These Imams never talked about our shared problems of drug addiction. The men in Pakistan and Afghanistan are heavy in the dope game. Gun culture is also out of control in some of their areas. Illiteracy especially with women is staggering. Gambling and prostitution is common also. Instead of addressing these huge problems we have in common, we are too busy giving the well educated south Asians in America pats on the back….Nobody has a gun to our head to follow their bogus program.

  37. kameelah says:

    not to pester…but what’s up?

  38. Kwame Madden says:

    Muslim unity unfortunely has become a fallacy to me.The racial ethnic statifications that exist in our community are voluntatry set up
    by those groups or people who want to be with there own kind.
    New York city has become your muslim ethnic divide cess pool.BAM have completely fallen to the waist side in NewYork City and also in westchester county right outside of the city.The future of BAM in the NewYork area calls for urgent action to take place.Many muslims from other parts of the country think that BAM in NewYork got it going on.Yes,at one time they did but that has come to abrupt end.
    Many ethnic groups are start out working with you then eventually break off once there numbers of there own group gets big enough.Thank you for being a nice host but we moving on to bigger and better things .Believe me they defintenly dont want your participation except for being security .Or may be marrying a sister for a green card..Much of what has happen is due also to own failings.Our refusal to act has now lead us to a future almost of non existence.Our numbers might be alot compared to other places were BAM muslims reside but believe me we are powerless and scattered all over the place.

  39. Kwame Madden says:

    Kameelah my salaams,I looked at your blog the future is bright for you young lady.You are talented and gifted keep up the good work.

  40. dawudwalid says:

    As-Salaamu `Alaykum,

    Br. Kwame, you have introduced a classic “Red Herring” allusion by bringing up Al-Arian supporting Bush in 2000 with him being accussed of terrorism.

    What in the heck does that have to do with the fact that Al-Arian was acquitted on major terrorism related charges yet is still being detained w/o due process? His support of Bush in 2000 merits him being held illegally?

    Even if they were ignorant in supporting Bush and ignored the BAM opinion, that doesn’t mean that we should be unjust. See Surah 5, ayah 8.

    Some of us, who claim to be on the Sunnah, have turned into immigrant loathers more than the NOI.

    Wassalaam.

  41. Kwame Maddem says:

    Bro DawudWalid I in no way support Bush ,Cheney and their criminal gang.Their illegal incarceration of muslims hurts me also, but our silence bothers me just as much.To talk about or even inform muslims about what is happening can lead to a person total islolation
    depending on the consciencness level of that particular community.Most of our communties are a poltical or assimilationists or scared to death to resist what has been coming at muslims in North America from
    the power structure. My stating factual info.should in no way throw me into the camp of the neo-cons.But the organzations and leaders who supported these crazy neo-cons did an injustice to the Muslims by being so hard headed. Many BAMs tried to inform them that they were making a
    mistake. Bush’s record alone as number one in death penalty executions in Texas, where he was governor, should of been enough of a warning .
    Bush made Muslim groups promises if they supported him this is what he would offer in exchange. Lets be honest brother, for Muslims this ended up being a smack in the face. BAM opinion and knowledge of the history and political landscape of this country was completely ignored.I can recall many debates with brothers from abroad about this issue of supporting the Bush ,Cheney ticket.Yes the Clinton adminstration had
    already started rounding up of Muslims and going after their charties. And before that, he implemented the notorious crime bill aimed at the black community, mainly the youth. One thing led to another, and we must always try to connect the dots.There were few only a few brothers I knew who were able to make the connection, but they were overlooked or ignored as mere conspiracy theorists. No, I dont support what’s happened to Sami Arian, but I am going to state the facts concerning our poltical immaturity in 2000. We make du’a for all our brothers that Allah protect and keep them strong in Iman..

  42. Kwame Madden says:

    Bro.Dawud if some of us BAM have become immigrant loathers as you claim you should ask yourself why?Most BAM have always tried to show brotherhood and sisterhood to to immigrant community.Lets set the record straight we are ones who have been the victims.Some of our Masjids ,schools and institutions run by our brothers from abroad are plagued with racism.Just walking through the door BAM is looked at with disdain or suspicion.I know many BAM muslims who wives and children who rather sit at home then go to the Masjid.
    This because of the continue snubbing they receive by others who are supose to be there brothers and sisters.I know for fact there immigrant muslims who wont dare even eat our food as thouigh we all have some incurable diseases.This is fact not fiction my apolgist brother.You yourself know this to be true of expiernces BAM face.When has CAIR or MAS ever spoken about or raised defense money for the dozens of BAM poltical prisoners who have been locked up for over 25 and 30yrs.When will these organzations invite Dhoruba Bin Wahad or a Bilal Abdul Hakeem to speak at one of there events.Bro.Dhrouba spent !9yrs in the peitentiary until his conviction was overturned he was framed by this goverment like many of his comrades.Bro.Bilal is in Patterson,NJ a committed activist.
    MAS claims iqaamatideen but believe it wont come about becoming mainstream voting american muslims.Lets not forgot also Mas stole this name for there organzation from W.DMuhammad they won in court more than likely on some technicality or maybe copyright issue.
    Know I’m not defintenly a follower of W.D.Muhammad just stating a fact.I know you are doing your job but some of us BAM are free.
    from this static thinking we once succumb to we will call like it is as long as it is the truth .The days of immigrant muslim poltical groups and organzations hegemony is coming to a near end.The writing is on all the wall.You can join us or get left behind in the dust..

  43. […] of injustice that Muslims have faced in recent history. Unfortunately, some of our brothers (like this) have fallen to the right-wing Islamophobic propaganda against our […]

  44. Kwame Madden says:

    Fortunely, I never have had a history of being used by the the right wing like some of our brother and sisters.Supporting Geroge W.Bush doesn’t call for questioning.Akhee they played some of us and they got nothing in return but jail sentences.How many iftar dinners at the white house and the state department.The brothers that I am affilated would never be so stupid.

  45. musa abdul malik says:

    all i have to say about this is that if you lay down with dogs you
    will get up with flees. and that’s what some of these brother did
    they got caught up in things that they should not have been into
    anyway. i ask all the Muslims if the prophet Muhammad was here
    would he be standing behind anybody waiting to cast his vote?
    and it was not always like this the brother’s who blaze the early
    path in this county always said that ALLAH gave the Deen to his
    prophet p.b.w.h. and made it to be over all the system’s that is
    on this earth.but the brothers came over from other part of the
    Muslim world and they want so bad to mixs in with this american
    way of life and for get what the prophet said

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  47. Hamza says:

    Attacking the immigrant community is not correct. We are all Muslims… While it is correct that many “Muslim” organizations are in fact fronts for international Muslim movements, most immigrant Arab and Indo-Pak Muslims who attend mosques in this country are just innocents who don’t know anything about Ikhwan or Hizbollah or anyone else. It is important to recognize our differences by race and religion (within the Muslim community there are many different religions)–but while respecting our diversity we can still have mutual respect and goodwill. Just as ikhwan and Hizbollah are wrong–well so too is the revolutionary “Blackamerican” movement. Islam is not about revolution. Islam is a religion, not a political movement. It is service to God Almighty. Politics is not Islam.

  48. @ Hamza

    Thank you brother Hamza, you are a true brother. And if you got the impression I was talking about all immigrant Muslims then I apologize to you and anyone I have offended.

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